4 Command is server-start not start-server
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Automatically starting a server if one is not already started

This should be the same for any Emacs build. Add this snippet to your .emacs or .emacs.d/init.el.

(require 'server)
(unless (server-running-p)
  (start-server-start)) 

And then just start emacs by running the runemacs.exe executable that comes with the build.

How to call emacs so that it utilizes the server (e.g. from command line or third party tools)

Emacs' Windows build comes with an emacsclientw.exe executable in the bin/ directory. Use the full path to that executable as your editor of choice on any third party tools you need to configure.

Context menu support (e.g. right-click on a file and allow it to be sent to emacs for viewing and editing)

  1. Right click on a file, select Open With -> Select Default Program.
  2. In the window that pops up, navigate to your emacsclientw.exe executable mentioned above and choose it.
  3. If you don't want Emacs to be the default, do steps 1 and 2 again, choosing a different program as the default.

emacsclientw.exe will now always be an option in the context menu.

Automatically starting a server if one is not already started

This should be the same for any Emacs build. Add this snippet to your .emacs or .emacs.d/init.el.

(require 'server)
(unless (server-running-p)
  (start-server)) 

And then just start emacs by running the runemacs.exe executable that comes with the build.

How to call emacs so that it utilizes the server (e.g. from command line or third party tools)

Emacs' Windows build comes with an emacsclientw.exe executable in the bin/ directory. Use the full path to that executable as your editor of choice on any third party tools you need to configure.

Context menu support (e.g. right-click on a file and allow it to be sent to emacs for viewing and editing)

  1. Right click on a file, select Open With -> Select Default Program.
  2. In the window that pops up, navigate to your emacsclientw.exe executable mentioned above and choose it.
  3. If you don't want Emacs to be the default, do steps 1 and 2 again, choosing a different program as the default.

emacsclientw.exe will now always be an option in the context menu.

Automatically starting a server if one is not already started

This should be the same for any Emacs build. Add this snippet to your .emacs or .emacs.d/init.el.

(require 'server)
(unless (server-running-p)
  (server-start)) 

And then just start emacs by running the runemacs.exe executable that comes with the build.

How to call emacs so that it utilizes the server (e.g. from command line or third party tools)

Emacs' Windows build comes with an emacsclientw.exe executable in the bin/ directory. Use the full path to that executable as your editor of choice on any third party tools you need to configure.

Context menu support (e.g. right-click on a file and allow it to be sent to emacs for viewing and editing)

  1. Right click on a file, select Open With -> Select Default Program.
  2. In the window that pops up, navigate to your emacsclientw.exe executable mentioned above and choose it.
  3. If you don't want Emacs to be the default, do steps 1 and 2 again, choosing a different program as the default.

emacsclientw.exe will now always be an option in the context menu.

3 added 1 character in body; added 2 characters in body
source | link

Automatically starting a server if one is not already started

This should be the same for any Emacs build. Add this snippet to your .emacs or .emacs.d/init.el.

(require 'server)
(unless (server-running-p)
  (start-server)) 

And then just start emacs by running the runemacs.exe executable that comes with the build.

How to call emacs so that it utilizes the server (e.g. from command line or third party tools)

Emacs' Windows build comes with an emacsclientemacsclientw.exe executable in the bin/ directory. Use the full path to that executable as your editor of choice on any third party tools you need to configure.

Context menu support (e.g. right-click on a file and allow it to be sent to emacs for viewing and editing)

  1. Right click on a file, select Open With -> Select Default Program.
  2. In the window that pops up, navigate to your emacsclientemacsclientw.exe executable mentioned above and choose it.
  3. If you don't want Emacs to be the default, do steps 1 and 2 again, choosing a different program as the default.

emacsclientemacsclientw.exe will now always be an option in the context menu.

Automatically starting a server if one is not already started

This should be the same for any Emacs build. Add this snippet to your .emacs or .emacs.d/init.el.

(require 'server)
(unless (server-running-p)
  (start-server)) 

And then just start emacs by running the runemacs.exe executable that comes with the build.

How to call emacs so that it utilizes the server (e.g. from command line or third party tools)

Emacs' Windows build comes with an emacsclient.exe executable in the bin/ directory. Use the full path to that executable as your editor of choice on any third party tools you need to configure.

Context menu support (e.g. right-click on a file and allow it to be sent to emacs for viewing and editing)

  1. Right click on a file, select Open With -> Select Default Program.
  2. In the window that pops up, navigate to your emacsclient.exe executable mentioned above and choose it.
  3. If you don't want Emacs to be the default, do steps 1 and 2 again, choosing a different program as the default.

emacsclient.exe will now always be an option in the context menu.

Automatically starting a server if one is not already started

This should be the same for any Emacs build. Add this snippet to your .emacs or .emacs.d/init.el.

(require 'server)
(unless (server-running-p)
  (start-server)) 

And then just start emacs by running the runemacs.exe executable that comes with the build.

How to call emacs so that it utilizes the server (e.g. from command line or third party tools)

Emacs' Windows build comes with an emacsclientw.exe executable in the bin/ directory. Use the full path to that executable as your editor of choice on any third party tools you need to configure.

Context menu support (e.g. right-click on a file and allow it to be sent to emacs for viewing and editing)

  1. Right click on a file, select Open With -> Select Default Program.
  2. In the window that pops up, navigate to your emacsclientw.exe executable mentioned above and choose it.
  3. If you don't want Emacs to be the default, do steps 1 and 2 again, choosing a different program as the default.

emacsclientw.exe will now always be an option in the context menu.

2 added 22 characters in body
source | link

Automatically starting a server if one is not already started

This should be the same for any Emacs build. Add this snippet to your .emacs or .emacs.d/init.el.

(require 'server)
(unless (server-running-p)
  (start-server)) 

And then just start emacs by running the runemacs.exe executable that comes with the build.

How to call emacs so that it utilizes the server (e.g. from command line or third party tools)

Emacs' Windows build comes with an emacsclient.exe executable in the bin/ directory. Use the full path to that executable as your editor of choice on any third party tools you need to configure.

Context menu support (e.g. right-click on a file and allow it to be sent to emacs for viewing and editing)

  1. Right click on a file, select Open With -> Select Default Program.
  2. In the window that pops up, navigate to your emacsclient.exe executable mentioned above and choose it.
  3. If you don't want Emacs to be the default, do steps 1 and 2 again, choosing a different program as the default.

emacsclient.exe will now always be an option in the context menu.

Automatically starting a server if one is not already started

This should be the same for any Emacs build. Add this snippet to your .emacs or .emacs.d/init.el.

(unless (server-running-p)
  (start-server)) 

And then just start emacs by running the runemacs.exe executable that comes with the build.

How to call emacs so that it utilizes the server (e.g. from command line or third party tools)

Emacs' Windows build comes with an emacsclient.exe executable in the bin/ directory. Use the full path to that executable as your editor of choice on any third party tools you need to configure.

Context menu support (e.g. right-click on a file and allow it to be sent to emacs for viewing and editing)

  1. Right click on a file, select Open With -> Select Default Program.
  2. In the window that pops up, navigate to your emacsclient.exe executable mentioned above and choose it.
  3. If you don't want Emacs to be the default, do steps 1 and 2 again, choosing a different program as the default.

emacsclient.exe will now always be an option in the context menu.

Automatically starting a server if one is not already started

This should be the same for any Emacs build. Add this snippet to your .emacs or .emacs.d/init.el.

(require 'server)
(unless (server-running-p)
  (start-server)) 

And then just start emacs by running the runemacs.exe executable that comes with the build.

How to call emacs so that it utilizes the server (e.g. from command line or third party tools)

Emacs' Windows build comes with an emacsclient.exe executable in the bin/ directory. Use the full path to that executable as your editor of choice on any third party tools you need to configure.

Context menu support (e.g. right-click on a file and allow it to be sent to emacs for viewing and editing)

  1. Right click on a file, select Open With -> Select Default Program.
  2. In the window that pops up, navigate to your emacsclient.exe executable mentioned above and choose it.
  3. If you don't want Emacs to be the default, do steps 1 and 2 again, choosing a different program as the default.

emacsclient.exe will now always be an option in the context menu.

1
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