2 remove double buffer since it works regardless of toolkit
source | link

Reasons to use Lucid over GTK

Stability

Examples from etc/PROBLEMS:

** When Emacs is compiled with Gtk+, closing a display kills Emacs.
...

*** Emacs built with GTK+ toolkit produces corrupted display on HiDPI screen
*** Emacs built with GTK+ toolkit can unexpectedly widen frames

Recent example: Bug#25228 "custom-set-faces from init file ~/.emacs ignored" only affects GTK builds.

And generally, new GTK versions could cause breakage, but that's much less of a concern with Lucid.

Also, GTK builds regularly emit scary looking (but harmless??) assertion failures on stderr ;)

Resource consumption

  • top reports 374m virt, 45.5m resident for GTK emacs -Q on startup
  • top reports 340m virt, 31.0m resident for Lucid emacs -Q on startup

Reasons to use GTK over Lucid

Supports some fancier features

It looks nicer

The differences are in the menus, toolbars, and scrollbars (which default to the "wrong" side in Lucid). Lucid screenshot is first (I put the scrollbar on the right side, for easier comparison with GTK).

Screenshot of Lucid build Screenshot of GTK build


PS there is also an option to make a "Motif" build, but (almost) nobody uses that.

Reasons to use Lucid over GTK

Stability

Examples from etc/PROBLEMS:

** When Emacs is compiled with Gtk+, closing a display kills Emacs.
...

*** Emacs built with GTK+ toolkit produces corrupted display on HiDPI screen
*** Emacs built with GTK+ toolkit can unexpectedly widen frames

Recent example: Bug#25228 "custom-set-faces from init file ~/.emacs ignored" only affects GTK builds.

And generally, new GTK versions could cause breakage, but that's much less of a concern with Lucid.

Also, GTK builds regularly emit scary looking (but harmless??) assertion failures on stderr ;)

Resource consumption

  • top reports 374m virt, 45.5m resident for GTK emacs -Q on startup
  • top reports 340m virt, 31.0m resident for Lucid emacs -Q on startup

Reasons to use GTK over Lucid

Supports some fancier features

It looks nicer

The differences are in the menus, toolbars, and scrollbars (which default to the "wrong" side in Lucid). Lucid screenshot is first (I put the scrollbar on the right side, for easier comparison with GTK).

Screenshot of Lucid build Screenshot of GTK build


PS there is also an option to make a "Motif" build, but (almost) nobody uses that.

Reasons to use Lucid over GTK

Stability

Examples from etc/PROBLEMS:

** When Emacs is compiled with Gtk+, closing a display kills Emacs.
...

*** Emacs built with GTK+ toolkit produces corrupted display on HiDPI screen
*** Emacs built with GTK+ toolkit can unexpectedly widen frames

Recent example: Bug#25228 "custom-set-faces from init file ~/.emacs ignored" only affects GTK builds.

And generally, new GTK versions could cause breakage, but that's much less of a concern with Lucid.

Also, GTK builds regularly emit scary looking (but harmless??) assertion failures on stderr ;)

Resource consumption

  • top reports 374m virt, 45.5m resident for GTK emacs -Q on startup
  • top reports 340m virt, 31.0m resident for Lucid emacs -Q on startup

Reasons to use GTK over Lucid

Supports some fancier features

It looks nicer

The differences are in the menus, toolbars, and scrollbars (which default to the "wrong" side in Lucid). Lucid screenshot is first (I put the scrollbar on the right side, for easier comparison with GTK).

Screenshot of Lucid build Screenshot of GTK build


PS there is also an option to make a "Motif" build, but (almost) nobody uses that.

1
source | link

Reasons to use Lucid over GTK

Stability

Examples from etc/PROBLEMS:

** When Emacs is compiled with Gtk+, closing a display kills Emacs.
...

*** Emacs built with GTK+ toolkit produces corrupted display on HiDPI screen
*** Emacs built with GTK+ toolkit can unexpectedly widen frames

Recent example: Bug#25228 "custom-set-faces from init file ~/.emacs ignored" only affects GTK builds.

And generally, new GTK versions could cause breakage, but that's much less of a concern with Lucid.

Also, GTK builds regularly emit scary looking (but harmless??) assertion failures on stderr ;)

Resource consumption

  • top reports 374m virt, 45.5m resident for GTK emacs -Q on startup
  • top reports 340m virt, 31.0m resident for Lucid emacs -Q on startup

Reasons to use GTK over Lucid

Supports some fancier features

It looks nicer

The differences are in the menus, toolbars, and scrollbars (which default to the "wrong" side in Lucid). Lucid screenshot is first (I put the scrollbar on the right side, for easier comparison with GTK).

Screenshot of Lucid build Screenshot of GTK build


PS there is also an option to make a "Motif" build, but (almost) nobody uses that.