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In Ubuntu, AucTeX has an addon called catdvi. What is its use by AucTeX? Some other questions I have include:

  1. How can I invoke catdvi in my gnome-terminal? C-c C-c will invoke a GUI viewer.

  2. For TeX-PDF-mode, what command to view pdf files in terminal?

  • What version of Ubuntu are you running? – Luke Sep 26 '14 at 0:31
  • Ubuntu 12.04 @King. – Tim Sep 26 '14 at 0:36
  • presumably related to apt-cache show catdvi – Edgar Aroutiounian Sep 26 '14 at 0:39
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CatDVI translates a TeX Device Independent (DVI) file into a readable plaintext file. It aims to generate high-quality output that reproduces all aspects of the DVI file within the limits of the output medium. CatDVI uses Unicode internally and can output ASCII, ISO Latin 1 and UTF-8 Unicode.

CatDVI can be used for previewing TeX documents on character-cell displays such as traditional terminals and terminal emulators. It is also possible to use it in generation of plain text documents from TeX source, assuming that the document is written with this conversion in mind.

CatDVI is under development and as such yet incomplete. However, it is quite useful even in its current form and already outperforms some of its competition in some areas.

CatDVI requires that the TFM files for all fonts used in its input DVI files are installed or can be generated by kpathsea.

In order to invoke catdvi from the gnome-terminal, just type:

catdvi file

In many systems less uses lesspipe, which can handle pdftotext automatically. Therefore, you can immediately try:

 less file.pdf

Which will show the output of pdftotext in less.

Source: catdvi

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    (1) How can I invoke catdvi in my gnome-terminal? C-c C-c will invoke GUI viewer. (2) For TeX-PDF-mode, what command to view pdf files in terminal? – Tim Sep 26 '14 at 0:47
  • I will answer that. Just edit into your question, and I will edit into my answer. – Luke Sep 26 '14 at 0:48
  • yes. done already – Tim Sep 26 '14 at 0:55
  • Can I call less file.pdf from emacs in AucTeX? – Tim Sep 26 '14 at 2:42
  • @Tim -- Sure. Just do something like M-x shell (or eshell), then less file.pdf if you are in the directory where the file is. M-x shell | M-x eshell opens a new buffer running (probably in your case) bash. – jon Oct 24 '14 at 2:59

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