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I am using emacs to read man pages.

macsman() {
    emacsclient -nw -e "(let ((Man-notify-method 'bully)) (man \"$1\"))"
}
alias man=macsman

(define-key Man-mode-map "q" 'save-buffers-kill-emacs)

While man buffer is opened, when I press q it usually exits.

It is bound to If the current frame has no client, kill Emacs itself using ‘save-buffers-kill-emacs’.

After running ex: man ls and pressing "q" in order to exit and get back to my shell, I find myself in *Messages* buffer, than pressing q again opens the man page again, and finally pressing q exits emacs. What may be the reason of this?

Would it be possible to exit right away by preventing opening *Messages* buffer?

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  • Sorry, its bound to save-buffers-kill-emacs
    – alper
    Oct 19, 2021 at 9:57

1 Answer 1

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If you're just popping in and out for the man page, you don't need the save-buffers-kill-emacs because there are no buffers to save. Just unconditionally kill Emacs.

Command: kill-emacs &optional exit-data

This command calls the hook kill-emacs-hook, then exits the Emacs 
process and kills it.

If exit-data is an integer, that is used as the exit status of the       
Emacs process. (This is useful primarily in batch operation; see Batch   
Mode.)

If exit-data is a string, its contents are stuffed into the terminal 
input buffer so that the shell (or whatever program next reads input)  
can read them.

If exit-data is neither an integer nor a string, or is omitted, that 
means to use the (system-specific) exit status which indicates 
successful program termination. 
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  • Thanks! Yes I was just popping in and out for the man page. Seems like kill-emacs also kill the emacs daemon, would it be possible to keep emacs daemon running
    – alper
    Oct 20, 2021 at 9:31
  • No but I believe there's a restart if stopped switch for the daemon. Oct 22, 2021 at 2:10
  • Does restart completely kills the emacs daemon?
    – alper
    Oct 22, 2021 at 9:53
  • The idea is that if Emacs detects that the daemon has been stopped, it restarts it. Oct 22, 2021 at 13:03

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