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for questions about Emacs Lisp as a Lisp dialect, that is, questions *about the language* itself. DO NOT USE it for questions about customization or how to write an application. Emacs Lisp is the scripting and programming language that the Emacs editor is built on.

8
votes
You can use a regular expression to recognize positive integers written in decimal expansion: they are the strings that consist only of decimal digits, where at least one of the digits is nonzero. (s …
answered Jul 30 '15 by Gilles 'SO- stop being evil'
13
votes
Yes, provided that the code in helm.el or helm.elc respects the rule that it must call (provide 'helm). The call (provide 'helm) marks the symbol helm as a loaded feature, and this causes the second c …
answered Feb 16 '15 by Gilles 'SO- stop being evil'
2
votes
The outer let is evaluated during the expansion of the macro; it binds the symbol bodysym. The inner let is evaluated when the resulting code is executed; it binds a symbol whose name is body. Here i …
answered Feb 22 '15 by Gilles 'SO- stop being evil'
6
votes
The function buffer-list returns a list of buffers. Call buffer-modified-p to test if a buffer has been modified and buffer-file-name to test if a buffer is visiting a file. The following snippet fro …
answered Nov 5 '14 by Gilles 'SO- stop being evil'
5
votes
Learn Emacs Lisp through the official tutorial and by customizing your Emacs environment. Being hands-on is a huge advantage when learning, and learning Emacs Lisp gives you the opportunity to apply y …
answered Sep 21 '15 by Gilles 'SO- stop being evil'
1
vote
Here's the code I have in my dot files. This code evolved over the years while maintaining backward compatibility; it should work with any Emacs or XEmacs version since the late 19.x series. If you on …
answered Dec 12 '16 by Gilles 'SO- stop being evil'
2
votes
Don't modify files in Emacs's directory. They'll be overwritten if you upgrade Emacs and they won't be available on other machines. Instead, provide your own definition for the function in your init …
answered Dec 27 '14 by Gilles 'SO- stop being evil'
10
votes
Elisp is an interpreted language. You can put version-specific code in your .emacs, but protect it by testing at load time that it's operating on the correct version. (if (is-new-feature-available …
answered Oct 9 '14 by Gilles 'SO- stop being evil'
2
votes
Write an infinite loop, and catch the error outside the loop. (condition-case nil (while t (org-move-subtree-up)) (error nil)) Org mode 7.8.11 throws a plain error for this message. If …
answered Mar 29 '15 by Gilles 'SO- stop being evil'
2
votes
By request, here's my implementation of function-argspec and function-arity. I used Jordon Biondo's original solution for Emacs 24 bytecode. (cond ;; XEmacs ((fboundp 'compiled-function-arglist) …
answered Aug 21 '15 by Gilles 'SO- stop being evil'
4
votes
Using (define-key my-magical-mode-map …) is the normal way. When you use a hook and local-set-key, the keys are added each time you enter My Magical mode in some buffer. This is weird because local-s …
answered Oct 10 '14 by Gilles 'SO- stop being evil'
25
votes
A lot of things in Emacs operate on the current buffer. You need to change the current buffer and restore it when you're done. Use with-current-buffer for simple cases where you just need to do someth …
answered Oct 5 '14 by Gilles 'SO- stop being evil'
10
votes
Call unload-feature to undefine all symbols that were defined as part of loading an Elisp source or byte-compiled file. Make sure that your file ends by calling provide at the end. This assumes that …
answered Oct 30 '14 by Gilles 'SO- stop being evil'
3
votes
Use up-list or backward-up-list to move forward or backward to the first enclosing bracket, then forward-list or backward-list to locate the matching bracket. Delete the closing bracket then the openi …
answered Jan 4 by Gilles 'SO- stop being evil'
8
votes
Emacs's built-in date parser is parse-time-string in parse-time.el, called by date-to-time. It understands English month and weekday names and several combinations of elements in various orders, but n …
answered Oct 1 '14 by Gilles 'SO- stop being evil'

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