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You can use symbol-function to get the function associated with a symbol. If the function hasn’t been loaded yet, then this will be a list starting with the symbol autoload rather than an actual function object. The other elements in this list mean other things; in particular, the second element of the list is the name of the file to load. For example, if ...


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Neither variable nor function. Autoloads are defined in (one or more) files. The default file for this is loaddefs.el, provided with Emacs. This is explained in the Elisp manual, node Autoload: The command M-x update-file-autoloads writes a corresponding autoload call into loaddefs.el. (The string that serves as the autoload cookie and the name of the file ...


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If you use require in your init file, then Emacs must load the package. If you don’t use require, then Emacs doesn’t need to load anything. The mistake most people make is to require every package that they want to use. 99% of the time you can configure any package you want (by setting its variables, for example), without ever requireing the package. The ...


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You'll find the org loaddefs in org-loaddefs.el, due to the file-local variable generated-autoload-file. cl-macs is not a package, it is an internal component of cl-lib, which is in finder-inf.el.


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In addition to what @db48x said, this is how it happens, and how you can yourself update loaddefs.el (or another file of autoloads). C-h f batch-update-autoloads tells us: batch-update-autoloads is an autoloaded Lisp function in autoload.el. (batch-update-autoloads) Update loaddefs.el autoloads in batch mode. Calls update-directory-autoloads on the command ...


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loaddefs.el is automatically generated at build time. See src/Makefile.in line 774 (in whatever version I happened to have checked out; it might be a different line in yours).


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