4

Customize option whitespace-display-mappings. That's what it's for. M-x customize-option whitespace-display-mappings RET The doc gives you details (below), but just look at the Customize buffer and things will be even clearer. You can use C-u C-x = with the cursor before a given character, to see its Unicode code point. C-h v whitespace-display-mappings ...


2

The docs of standard-display-table refer to buffer-display-table which mentions that you can create display tables with make-display-table if necessary. This means the following should work: (let ((display-table (or standard-display-table (make-display-table)))) (set-display-table-slot display-table 'vertical-border (make-glyph-code ?┃)) (setq standard-...


1

I found a solution by "abusing" the display table. In the below solution, msg is a string whose length is window width +1 (such as to display the truncation character). I then set the truncation character to the last character of the string. (set-display-table-slot (window-display-table (minibuffer-window)) 'truncation (make-glyph-...


1

(set-display-table-slot·buffer-display-table 'wrap ?↩) works for me, with one caveat. In a terminal the arrow shows up correctly, but in the gui (with fringe-mode turned off), the glyph is drawn with a replacement character; apparently it couldn't find a glyph for the arrow in the chosen font. It does render correctly in the scratch buffer, but it's using a ...


1

Here is a very ugly solution. First, define a function to find hard newlines such that it can be used by font-lock-mode: (defun whitespace-find-hard-newlines (end) (search-forward "\n" end t) (while (and (not (memq 'hard (text-properties-at (match-beginning 0)))) (search-forward "\n" end t))) (memq 'hard (text-properties-at (match-beginning 0)))...


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