4

This is a Dead Keys problem, and it's mentioned in the Emacs wiki. All the workarounds explained there solve the issue.


3

[:ascii:] char class can help. C-M-% to query replace regexp \(\ *\)\([[:ascii:]]*[a-zA-z]\) with \1\\lr{\2} If new line character must not be included into sentence then change regexp to replace to \(\ *\)\([a-zA-z ]*[a-zA-z]\)


3

There is a package for that -- reverse-im (https://github.com/a13/reverse-im.el) It does what you want with one exception -- it doesn't work for magit menus and other packages that uses a kind of non-default(?) approach for keybindings. PS I use it for cyrillic too.


3

You can add a host of remappings of the form (define-key function-key-map [?\C-ь] [?\C-x]) See also https://stackoverflow.com/questions/10639429


2

Keybindings need to refer to commands, which means you need to wrap your code in a lambda form. Also this is Lisp, so you don't need to surround the arguments to a function in parentheses. That all adds up to: (global-set-key (kbd "M-v") (lambda () (interactive) (insert-char #x27)))


2

Check out M-xwhitespace-mode and M-xcustomize-group RETwhitespace By default it is set up to visually emphasise spaces, tabs, and line endings, but you can tune it to eg leave spaces alone.


2

The ?\C-j is the character representation of 10, in this case it's the same as control-j. For other values, it's more natural, for example 65, which is the ASCII value of A: 65 -> 65 (#o101, #x41, ?A)


2

Put your cursor over the character ‘ on the line (setq confirm-kill-emacs ‘yes-or-no-p) and press C-x =. Char: ‘ (8216, #o20030, #x2018, file ...) point=698 of 698 (100%) column=0 That's the left quotation mark (with C-u C-x = you can see its Unicode name: LEFT SINGLE QUOTATION MARK). This character has no special meaning to Emacs. You need to use the ...


1

C-h v register-separator says this: register-separator is a variable defined in register.el. Its value is nil Documentation: Register containing the text to put between collected texts, or nil if none. When collecting text with C-M-S-delete (or M-x prepend-to-register), contents of this register is added to the beginning (or end, ...


1

There are a few ways you can test whether a character is in a string. Here are two: (seq-contains "abcd" char) (memq char (string-to-list "abcd")) ; Which is just (memq char (append "abcd" nil)) (seq-contains is similar to what you did with seq-some.)


1

The following should work: M-x query-replace-regexp RET \([0-9]+\) RET \,(string (+ (1- ?a) \#1)) RET


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