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[:ascii:] char class can help. C-M-% to query replace regexp \(\ *\)\([[:ascii:]]*[a-zA-z]\) with \1\\lr{\2} If new line character must not be included into sentence then change regexp to replace to \(\ *\)\([a-zA-z ]*[a-zA-z]\)


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Put your cursor over the character ‘ on the line (setq confirm-kill-emacs ‘yes-or-no-p) and press C-x =. Char: ‘ (8216, #o20030, #x2018, file ...) point=698 of 698 (100%) column=0 That's the left quotation mark (with C-u C-x = you can see its Unicode name: LEFT SINGLE QUOTATION MARK). This character has no special meaning to Emacs. You need to use the ...


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The ?\C-j is the character representation of 10, in this case it's the same as control-j. For other values, it's more natural, for example 65, which is the ASCII value of A: 65 -> 65 (#o101, #x41, ?A)


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This behaviour is controlled by the eval-expression-print-maximum-character variable. eval-expression-print-maximum-character is a variable defined in `simple.el'. Its value is 2305843009213693951 Original value was 127 Probably introduced at or before Emacs version 26.1. Documentation: The largest integer that will be displayed as a character. This ...


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Your main confusion lies in that ^L isn't a two-characters regexp, it's an ASCII control character (page-break/ FORM FEED), that's why it appears in red in your system. on #3, if you iterate over the blanks and using M-x describe-char you'll notice that it should match either space or tab. Reasons are described in the documentation string: Regexp for ...


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C-h v register-separator says this: register-separator is a variable defined in register.el. Its value is nil Documentation: Register containing the text to put between collected texts, or nil if none. When collecting text with C-M-S-delete (or M-x prepend-to-register), contents of this register is added to the beginning (or end, ...


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There are a few ways you can test whether a character is in a string. Here are two: (seq-contains "abcd" char) (memq char (string-to-list "abcd")) ; Which is just (memq char (append "abcd" nil)) (seq-contains is similar to what you did with seq-some.)


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The following should work: M-x query-replace-regexp RET \([0-9]+\) RET \,(string (+ (1- ?a) \#1)) RET


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