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7

Add (setq frame-background-mode 'dark) to ~/.emacs.d/init.el


4

What you call the bottom bar is the "mode line". I recommend reading the first fews sections of the manual, especially this one to know the names of the various screen elements (this is not difficult at all, but not straightforward for newcomers.) The graphical attributes of text in emacs are grouped in "faces". As mentionned in the manual: By default, ...


4

@NickD provided a good answer: use a face. OP's comment to Nick's answer says that he'll try to write a function that, given a string, returns a propertized string. Such functions already exist: propertize does that, and so does add-face-text-property. For example: (setq ss (propertize "abcde" 'face '(:foreground "red"))) or (setq ss &...


2

It seems that setting the background color of the default font to an undefined value turns off any customization. This feels like a hack, and there might be a better way to do this, but this worked for me: ;; init.el (set-face-background 'default "undefined") Of course, if "undefined" will ever be defined (haha) in the color palette, this will break.


2

You need to create a string with the appropriate face. You do that by attaching a face text property to the string, giving it value of some face (predefined or defined for the specific purpose - you can look at all the predefined faces with M-x list-faces-display and pick one from there, or you can define your own face). E.g. here's a snippet to use a ...


1

I think that is because (regexp-opt foo 'words) assumes that your keywords are, well, words. Try to rewrite those expressions (and only those, leave the alphabetic ones alone) like this: (defun gmunu--concat-regexp (stuff) (if (null stuff) "" (let ((result (regexp-quote (car stuff))) (remaining (cdr stuff))) (while remaining ...


1

Have you applied a theme? In which case M-x: describe-face type "default" See what that is. Also, remember that terminals have pallettes. This stack exchange article will get you going.


1

You're confused: Re-installing Emacs will not help fix any problem due to installing a theme (just like redoing the road won't fix your car). The undesirable effects that might linger after disabling a theme only apply to the currently running Emacs session. Those undesirable effects should be considered as bugs and reported to the theme's author. They ...


1

(Variable color-themes is a list of your color themes. A given color theme is a function.) You can use command color-theme-analyze-defun to check whether a function definition (defun) at point defines a color theme. It's defined in color-theme.el. Here is its doc string: Once you have a color-theme printed, check for missing faces. This is used by ...


1

The default color theme (in Emacs-speak they're themes) isn't defined in a single place, but you can collect everything into one file by creating your own custom theme. start Emacs with emacs -Q to disable user and site-local configuration do M-x customize-create-theme RET y to create a customize buffer that includes basic faces. At the top of the buffer ...


1

What do you mean by "colorscheme", and more particularly, what do you mean by "the hex values of the default colorscheme"? If you're asking about particular colors that you see, where do you see the colors you're interested in? If they are for buffer text, put your cursor on some text with a particular color and do C-u C-x =. Buffer *Help* will tell you ...


1

NickD has a good answer but doesn't update your menu bar which may also have the same dark blue (can you see what it says when you type ctrl + s?). This method will also fix hard to read menus. Run emacs Type alt + x customize-themes Arrow down to manoj-dark and hit return (or pick a different theme) Type ctrl + x, ctrl + s to save the settings Type ctrl ...


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