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A combination of those works - just unbind the global key first. (global-unset-key (kbd "C-z")) (require 'evil) (setq evil-toggle-key "C-z") (evil-mode 1) Until evil-mode is activated, the key binding does not work. I assume you have evil-mode started by default, so the above should suit your workflow.


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(global-set-key [f2] nil) will 'unbind' f2, so you don't need to worry about accidentally entering 2C mode. There's no general way to disable all the function keys, but you can rebind them however you like, just like other keys. F5-F9 are reserved for user's to bind as they like, so they shouldn't be bound to anything already. Some package developers ...


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RYO (Roll Your Own) I read this post for inspiration, but ended up using ryo-modal-mode It is based on modalka-mode and allows for just one command layer that is not preconfigured, so you can add vim-like keys or just use emacs keys without Ctrl key. On the plus side there are keywords which allow you to use keys only in specific major modes and run ...


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I can't really answer on why some keybinding are put under , and some under C-c. To know the difference between the two, you can check what bindings they prefix with the shortcut , C-h and C-c C-h. Other usefull bindings are: C-h m to show what the current major mode bindings are C-h k C-c [ to know what's bound to C-c [ C-h f org-agenda-file-to-front ...


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It is (kbd "M-<tab>"). Note that M- is outside the <>


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To provide a more 'up-to-date' answer (for anyone new reading this): Looking at the helm source documentation it seems that we should use customize, and it clearly states that declaring helm-ff-lynx-style-map manually with setq will not work... I disagree, and this was found to be working fine: (require 'helm) (require 'helm-config) ;; to enable fuzzy ...


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Not sure I understand your question. Are you asking how, in each major mode, to bind to C-o whatever that mode normally binds to C-e? If so, then in after-change-major-mode-hook add a function such as this: (defun my-remap-C-e-to-C-o () "Remap whatever command is locally bound to `C-e` to `C-o`." (let* ((map (current-local-map)) (C-e-...


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Without more context, the direct answer to "is it possible to generate a keybinding for C-=" is "Yes". For example, (global-set-key (kbd "C-=") '(lambda () (interactive) (message "Hello world!"))) There are many other ways. For instance, my init contains the following use-package definition: (use-package expand-region :ensure t :bind (("C-=" . er/...


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Add at least one additional definition: (global-set-key (kbd "C-i") 'universal-argument) (define-key universal-argument-map (kbd "C-i") 'universal-argument-more) See additional universal-... definitions in both bindings.el and simple.el that may be rebound if so desired.


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As a work-around you can try C-q \. Try Étienne Deparis answer for a permanent resolution.


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Emacs by default doesn't associate \ with any command… You should be able to directly type it without any trouble. If you cannot, then you should have a module enabled, which takes it. If you need further help, please answer the following questions: are you using emacs in terminal (in a TTY?) or in graphical mode? where do you want to type a backslash? In ...


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The actual solution was pretty simple; I added following lines into .zshrc or .bashrc. bindkey -r "^O" bindkey "^O" backward-kill-word Link: https://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/285208/how-to-remove-a-zsh-keybinding-if-i-dont-know-what-it-does/285210#285210


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You're manipulating the wrong map: (with-eval-after-load 'evil (define-key evil-motion-state-map (kbd "g l") 'evil-end-of-line))


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As kindly pointed out, this question explains it: C-m and are equivalent in ASCII so we need to first amend how emacs interprets the key sequence C-m. So this should work: (define-key input-decode-map [?\C-m] [C-m]) (global-set-key (kbd "<C-m>") 'jump-char-backward)


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