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Figured it out two minutes after posting. In case it helps somebody else, the problem was that I had an outdated URL for the melpa package archive in my init.el. Perhaps there had been a redirect in place that caused it to function up until recently. For posterity, the correct value was available here: Melpa: Getting Started. As of July 2020, it was https://...


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Testing confirms that packages labeled "dependency" are those which are installed only because they are dependencies of other packages you have installed. The package manager actually won't let you uninstall a dependency (as doing so would break the package that requires it). Similarly, uninstalling an "installed" package which is also a dependency of ...


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It's talking about the specific version of the package. Let's look at the first D line there: avy. It's saying "avy version 20171230.220 is to be deleted". Elsewhere in the buffer, you should see a later version of avy, with I next to it to mark the installation. Having both means the package will be upgraded. In fact, Emacs will let you know that. When ...


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My understanding is that it simply means the existing version will be deleted (D) followed by downloading and installing the new version.


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Regarding 'dependency', I believe this refers to a package that is required by another package. From the manual, (emacs) Package Installation[1]. A package may “require” certain other packages to be installed, because it relies on functionality provided by them. When Emacs installs such a package, it also automatically downloads and installs any ...


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I can't tell you what it means (I can guess, but you'll probably get a good answer here). But I can tell you how to ask Emacs about it, in case you don't already know. Usually the Emacs doc provides such info (it should). C-h f list-packages gives you a brief description of the command. C-h r puts you in the Emacs manual. There, i list-packages takes you ...


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tl;dr make sure MELPA archive is added (if you need magit) I realized that magit is not in ELPA, it's in MELPA. I think I added MELPA archive back then, but that part of the config was supposedly lost owing to running several instances of Emacs, and orgmode editing the ~/.emacs file (adding agenda files).


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Short answer: You should recompile Emacs. Long answer: When it is compiled, the emacs executable is dumped with numerous elisp libraries pre-loaded. Amongst these libraries is the loaddefs.el library containing the autoload declarations for autoloaded functions in the standard distribution. So (a) deleting the libraries you don't want does not delete the ...


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I can't help with what shows up when you do M+x package-list-packages, but to clean-up the command namespace (minibuffer prompt, functions available to you in lisp, etc) there are a few hacks. The workaround You might be seeing functions even after deletion due to residual autoload files. Firstly you need to find out what are the locations of the ...


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The elpa-version darkroom-0.1.el of darkroom does not have an ;;;###autoload before (define-minor-mode darkroom-mode ...) as the github version has. That means that you can either install the the github version or put (autoload 'darkroom-mode "darkroom" nil t) into your init file.


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/ n (M-x package-menu-filter-by-name) does exactly what you want, it filters only the package name, e.g., / n lsp-mode gets only the lsp-mode package. / n runs the command package-menu-filter-by-name (found in package-menu-mode-map), which is an interactive compiled Lisp function in `package.el'. It is bound to / n, . (package-menu-filter-by-name NAME) ...


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Try C-h P (M-x describe-package), it allows you filter by package names through the minibuffer. If you use helm-mode, it looks like And in the *Packages* buffer, use Isearch and/or Occur, for example, to search packages start with lsp, use M-s o ^ +lsp M-s o is M-x occur.


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Visit GNU ELPA's website, you can see the package's size, e.g., https://elpa.gnu.org/packages/ace-window.html says ace-window-0.9.0.el, 2015-Jun-05, 18.7 KiB Visit MELPA's website, you can get package's download URL, e.g., https://melpa.org/#/dash (notes that the website is a SPA, aka, Single Page Application, if you visit it for the first time, it needs ...


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I also tried to find a way to identify all packages in a way similar to list-packages, but it seems not all libraries are considered as packages so they are not listed among other packages. There are a few ways of identify what is built-in into Emacs: Official Manuals which cover a lot of things, including manuals for various packages including RCIRC: GNU ...


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A quick stab at an answer. Someone may provide better info. Sounds like package-list-packages lists as "built-in" those libraries that Emacs knows it builds in. And it sounds like that is the only indication you are seeing that they exist. Unless you find some other indication, you can probably assume that package-list-packages doesn't intend that "built-in"...


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