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4

Are there cases in which [backquote] is the best choice Yes, when constructing complex list expressions that involve a lot of quoting, unquoting, and splicing. The best example of this is macro bodies. See the example in (info "(elisp) Defining Macros"): (defmacro t-becomes-nil (variable) `(if (eq ,variable t) (setq ,variable nil))) ...


1

Quoted values are established at read-time, and so incur no eval-time cost to build. So there ought to be a slight efficiency benefit to using a quoted value in cases where it's safe to do that. It it's a genuinely constant value, then quoting is the best choice. Are there any cases in which list should be avoided? quote returns the same1 value every time,...


0

list and quote do not function in the same way. list evaluates its arguments, and quote does not: (list 1 2 (+ 1 2)) ; => (1 2 3) (quote (1 2 (+ 1 2))) ; => (1 2 (+ 1 2))


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