2

You can use file variables (or in this case, a pseudo-variable) to do something when you open a particular file. Add something like this at the bottom of the file: # Local Variables: # eval: (progn (org-agenda-list) (split-window-below)) # End: In order to avoid confirmation questions, you'll also have to set a couple of variables in your init file: (setq ...


2

Generally the values inside org-agenda-custom-commands are hard-coded so you have no chance to prompt for input. But one of the choices for an entry type in org-agenda-custom-commands is a user defined function, which will be called with a single argument. So first define a function that prompts for a value of the WITH property and runs org-tags-view on ...


1

I ended up with the code below. I guess it can be shorten/optimized (it's a bit slow) but it does the job. (defface busy-1 '((t :foreground "black" :background "#eceff1")) "") (defface busy-2 '((t :foreground "black" :background "#cfd8dc")) "") (defface busy-3 '((t :foreground "black" :background "#b0bec5")) "") (defface busy-4 '((t :foreground "black" :...


1

You can do this either with tags or with properties. Assuming an org file that looks like this: * headline 1 :tag1: :PROPERTIES: :WITH: hello :END: * headline 2 :tag2: :PROPERTIES: :WITH: goodbye :END: * headline 3 Then C-c a m WITH="hello" RET will get you an agenda containing 'headline 1' (assuming that you're using C-...


1

It depends on what you're expecting out of it. On a given date agenda, pressing M will show you all the relevant info about moon ephemerides. If you want it inside your, say, daily agenda you'll have to add them as sexps in any of your agenda files. Note that there shouldn't be any subtree indentation before %% * Moon phases %%(my-moon-phases-function) ...


1

If this is really an appointment reminder, rather than a scheduled task, then the easiest thing to do is to forego the SCHEDULED: marker and just have the three timestamps listed (I like putting the timestamps on different lines, but you can put them on a single line if you want): * stuff to do <Monday 4/5/2020 +1w> <Wed 6/5/2020 +1w> <...


1

One idea would be to create a custom function that tests for specified days of the week. The following example is hard-coded to return t for Monday (i.e., 1), Wednesday (i.e., 3) and Friday (i.e., 5). This can be used in an org-mode file such as: * My Task SCHEDULED: <%%(diary-monday-wednesday-friday date)> Or, it can be used in a diary file and ...


1

If the value of org-agenda-files is a directory, by default all files with the extension .org will be considered for the agenda. See C-h v org-agenda-files for more information.


1

Define a function similar to the one that you want, but save the current frame configuration in some variable: (defvar my-pre-agenda-frame-configuration nil) (defun org-agenda-show-agenda-and-todo (&optional arg) (interactive "p") (setq my-pre-agenda-frame-configuration (current-frame-configuration)) (org-agenda arg "n")) Then define a ...


1

If you just want to have these meetings reflected in your clock data afterwards for reporting purposes, I don't think you need to actually clock in and out? You can just add the clock data directly: CLOCK: [2020-05-01 Fri 09:00]--[2020-05-01 Fri 09:30] => 0:30 You could come up with a capture template to let you enter the start/end times and put them in ...


1

I have a solution that worked for me, after some trial and error. Please bear with me as this is my first time answering a question on StackExchange. I also had Org agenda break with the error message Symbol's value as variable is void: org-tag-group-re. For me, this occurred while trying to install org-drill. For context, I'm running Emacs 26.3 on MacOS ...


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