18

I think you might consider this to be a partial solution to your question. If you include :step day in your clocktable line then you'll get several clock tables emitted -- one per day for the current week in your example. While this answers the first part of your question of showing what tasks were worked on per day, you'll still see those tasks under a ...


5

This is straightforward by using the :tags option in clocktable lines, and I use this to do something similar to you. I have a separate org file (clock.org in my case), which just contains clock tables with various time and project-specific tag filters. I then refresh the tables in this file when it comes time to pluck numbers out for a timesheet or whatever....


5

I had to do something similar at work and I solved it by calling the clocktable with a (calc) formula: #+BEGIN: clocktable :maxlevel 3 :block 2017-10-24 :formula "$2=$3;t::$3=if($2 == 0, string(\"\"), round(100*ceil($2*12)/12)/100)" #+END: Short explanation: Depending on your use of levels (maxlevels) you might need to change the column numbers. I usually ...


3

Based on this Gist: https://gist.github.com/tsu-nera/d9ffa6a51a6e7bdb957b Add it to init.el: (require 'org-table) (require 'org-clock) (defun clocktable-by-tag/shift-cell (n) (let ((str "")) (dotimes (i n) (setq str (concat str "| "))) str)) (defun clocktable-by-tag/insert-tag (params) (let ((tag (plist-get params :tags))) (insert "|...


2

You can define your own :formatter for clocktables. Such a formatter can sort the table data to your likings and delegate further formatting to the formatter determined by org-clock-clocktable-formatter or to the default formatter org-clocktable-write-default. The following example shows you how to define a sorting formatter my-org-clocktable-sorter and how ...


2

The order of table columns is hard-coded into the formatter org-clocktable-write-default. You can set this formatter with the argument :formatter in the clocktable header. But org-clocktable-write-default is quite a monster so you rather re-use it in your own formatter. Furthermore it directly writes out the table text. You cannot manipulate table data in ...


1

I am not quite sure what exactly you want: (a) the date the task was completed or (b) the last clock-out date. These are not necessarily the same. I have no solution for (b), but can provide one for (a): #+BEGIN: clocktable :properties ("CLOSED") #+END: The CLOSED property is one of a few special properties which is available with the :properties option. (...


1

That work with :fileskip0 t #+BEGIN: clocktable :scope agenda :fileskip0 t :maxlevel 1 :block today #+CAPTION: Clock summary at [2020-06-10 mer. 11:15], for mercredi, juin 10, 2020. | File | Headline | Time | |--------------+-----------------------+--------| | | ALL *Total time* | *4:03* | |--------------+-----------...


1

You shoud set org-clock-report-include-clocking-task to non-nil for that. It's a defcustom so just using setq might not work. It didn't for me.


1

This proposed answer does not work! (See the comments.) I leave it here as warning for others trying to answer this question. (Please keep the reputation of this answer at zero level. It does not an answer the question so it does not deserve a positive reputation but I definitively consider it valuable information for others trying so I don't think that it ...


1

{:} is used to add to the parent nodes a sum of the times for each of the child nodes in the table for that column. In column views anything in { } is to specify the summary type for that column. : is specifically for times. See SUMMARY-TYPE in the column attributes docs for more info.


1

You can include the currently running clock in the report by altering variable org-clock-report-include-clocking-task. Its documentation reads: "When non-nil, include the current clocking task time in clock reports." So you could use (setq org-clock-report-include-clocking-task t) Or use M-x customize-option org-clock-report-include-clocking-task ...


1

The closest thing I can come out of this was writing your own custom dynamic block. You can read more about it at C-h i g (org)Dynamic blocks. This, however, requires you to know more about Org-mode internals. The following is a very minimalist callback to generate weekly report on day-by-day basis. The basic idea is there and you can extend it to suit ...


1

You can only use the subtree scope if you're in a headline. Out of a headline you could use :scope file or file-with-archives.


1

I've found the error by commenting out lines in the emacs' init file, starting with a large selection of code and narrowing it down to one line. It turned out that a custom org-ref variable causes this error when it points to a folder that doesn't exist: (setq org-ref-pdf-directory "~/Documents/Bibliography/notes/org-ref-pdfs/")


1

I assume that every project has its own file and you want to sort w.r.t. the project time. You can apply a filter to your table and sort the filtered result. In the following I give an example of a possible adaption of one of the filters at https://emacs.stackexchange.com/a/20137/2370 for your case. Notes: The example does not sort the original table but ...


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