6

PDF export is handled by LaTeX, which provides endless ways to customize your document presentation. A relatively simple way to apply side-by-side formatting to tables in org-mode is to wrap them in minipage environments: #+ATTR_LATEX: :options {0.4\textwidth} #+begin_minipage | one | two | three | |-----+-----+-------| | cat | dog | fish | |-----+-----+---...


6

upcase is hard-coded into org-ascii-template--document-title of Org-version 9.2.6. The following Elisp code neutralizes that upcase by temporarily setting upcase to identity. Note that one of the preconditions of the advice is that the source code of ox-ascii is available to Emacs. That is the case if you have installed the Melpa version of Org or you have ...


4

Your init file defines a notes class that can be used by org when exporting to LaTeX: #+LATEX_CLASS: notes It works fine, in the sense that it produces a latex output that starts out like this: \documentclass{notes} ... But then, the org exporter calls pdflatex (or xelatex or something else depending on your setup) to process the LaTeX file. And guess ...


4

You don't have one list here: you have two. The Text here... is a separate paragraph and that's not something you can have within a single list. The best that you can do, I think, is to tell your second list numbering to start with 3 (see the [@3] construct below), but note that if you add a third element to the first list, you will need to tweak the ...


4

I cite from https://orgmode.org/manual/Quoting-HTML-tags.html: The HTML export back-end transforms < and > to &lt; and &gt;. To include raw HTML code in the Org file so the HTML export back-end can insert that HTML code in the output, use this inline syntax: @@html:...@@. For example: @@html:<b>@@bold text@@html:</b>@@ In ...


3

The following Elisp code modifies the html export backend so that it accepts an additional option HTML_TABLEEL_ORG. If you set this option to t or yes table cells in table.el-tables are rendered as org-mode strings. You can copy the code into your init file if the first line of your init file contains the file-local setting lexical-binding: t as ...


3

You can use special blocks to achieve this: * section 1 \hfill #+attr_latex: :options {0.95\textwidth} #+begin_minipage - S1 - S2 #+end_minipage


3

These conversions are defined by a set of regular expressions in file ox-export.el: (defconst org-html-special-string-regexps '(("\\\\-" . "&#x00ad;") ; shy ("---\\([^-]\\)" . "&#x2014;\\1") ; mdash ("--\\([^-]\\)" . "&#x2013;\\1") ; ndash ("\\.\\.\\." . "&#x2026;")) ; hellip "Regular expressions for special ...


3

If you can do it from within emacs, then you can do it from the command line with something like this for HTML: emacs --batch --eval "(require 'org)" notes.org --funcall org-html-export-to-html or for PDF: emacs --batch --eval "(require 'org)" appts.org --funcall org-latex-export-to-pdf This assumes that you use the Org mode that is bundled with emacs: ...


3

Macroexpansion of the body of with-eval-after-load happens eagerly, i.e. before ox-ascii is loaded. So at that time, the slot is not defined and the setf/cl-pushnew macroexpander doesn't know what to do and chooses a default setter which is not the one that cl-defstruct will define. Better move that code to a separate file: (require 'ox-ascii) (cl-pushnew ...


2

configure_jekyll_front_matter gets 'html as argument BACKEND and not 'jekyllHtmlPost because you use the export functions of the html backend in the :menu-entry of the derived backend. You must replace the export functions org-html-export-as-html, ... in your derived backend with your own versions org-jekyllHtmlPost-export-as-html, ... . You find all the ...


2

(setq org-export-with-tasks 'todo) As from description of variable, it can be placed as file local variable. Or you could include at in the #+OPTIONS line: tasks:todo, and you would get ignored DONE tasks by export. Review other options for this variable as well. This may have the following values: t include tasks independent of state. ‘...


2

I would use #+ATTR_LATEX: :width 10.6\textwidth [[file:curves.jpg]] This is described here: https://orgmode.org/manual/Images-in-LaTeX-export.html For specifying image ‘:width’, ‘:height’, and other ‘:options’, use this syntax: #+ATTR_LATEX: :width 5cm :options angle=90 [[./img/sed-hr4049.pdf]]


2

John Kitchin initially wrote a simple program to do this. He then improved it and made it into ox-clip a org-mode based Emacs package, which is easy to get through Melpa's repository. Not only does it avoid wrapping text, it also preserves the format on the clipboard so that it is a breeze to paste. ox-clip may need you to install a clipboard manager ...


2

For reference I found this message on the org-mode mailing list which mentions a way to do this by means of file local #+LATEX_HEADER lines which use the fancyvrb package and redefine the verbatim environment that org-mode #+RESULTS blocks get exported to via: #+LATEX_HEADER: \RequirePackage{fancyvrb} #+LATEX_HEADER: \DefineVerbatimEnvironment{verbatim}{...


2

You have to use the :minlevel option on the #+INCLUDE: line to get b.org to start at the second level (the corollary is that you might as well not worry about the levels in b.org itself): main.org: #+INCLUDE: a.org #+INCLUDE: b.org :minlevel 2 b.org: * I have another second level section ... but that is set through the #+INCLUDE directive in the ...


2

You can add arbitrary LaTeX code to your org mode file like this: * Section 1 #+LATEX: \hfill #+LATEX: \begin{minipage}{0.95\textwidth} - S1 item 1 - S1 item 2 #+LATEX: \end{minipage} That will produce exactly what you want (plus a label, but that's standard).


2

As mentioned in my comment, there are tags that can be used to control the export of a (sub)tree: a tree that is tagged "noexport" will (by default) not be exported: e.g. * Document ** Exported section This section is not tagged, so it will be exported by default. ** Hidden section :noexport: This ...


2

Change the syntax of character - from symbol to punctuation in org-mode. You can do that by: (defun my-org-change-minus-syntax-fun () (modify-syntax-entry ?- ".")) (add-hook 'org-mode-hook #'my-org-change-minus-syntax-fun) You can add these lines to your init file. Note that I have running that setup for ages now with no relevant negative effects.


2

When I evaluate the inline src block: src_sh[:results value :exports code]{git --version} I get the following in my org mode buffer: src_sh[:results value :exports code]{git --version} {{{results(=git version 2.24.1=)}}} If you get the same thing, then the only thing you have to do is define a macro that will do what you want: #+MACRO: results returning ...


2

If a region is active org-md-export-as-markdown exports the region only. So we have to loop through each headline set the active region export the region to a markdown buffer and finally use the title to save it (defun my-org-export-each-headline-to-markdown (&optional scope) "Export each headline to a markdown file with the title as filename. If ...


2

Use a Noweb reference <<src block call>> to inject the results of source blocks into other source blocks. Example: #+NAME: ltxInput #+BEGIN_SRC emacs-lisp :exports none :results raw drawer "\\sqrt{x^2+y^2}" #+END_SRC #+RESULTS: ltxInput :results: \sqrt{x^2+y^2} :end: #+NAME: ltxSrc #+BEGIN_SRC latex :noweb yes :exports results \begin{align*} &...


2

I think the best thing to do here is make a custom exporter. Here is an example that treats checkbox items specially. Note this does not work as expected with a nested checkbox list, but I think it handles your specific example. (setq org-html-checkbox-type 'html) (require 'ox) (org-export-define-derived-backend 'my-html 'html :translate-alist '((item . ...


2

It's possible exporting body-only "as is" using the following keys: C-cC-eC-bhH Note that the only thing it differs from your command is C-b before the formatting export options. At least using Emacs 27.0.9 and the last org from melpa.


2

Any lines that could be confused as Org mode markup (e.g. both of the lines in your example block) can be quoted by preceding them with a ,: #+BEGIN_SRC ,* User-defined Markers ,** MARKER_1 #+END_SRC See Literal Examples in the manual. As @Tobias and @Hubisan point out in the comments, it's a very good idea to mark the source block as an org source block: ...


2

If you are using org-tempo you should first indent the line before inserting the template shortcut <q for the quote-block. That means if you have the input 1. First question | where the bar | stands for the cursor position, type TAB to arrive at the indented position as shown in the following code: 1. First question | then input the structure ...


2

That's either a bug or a feature in the ox-gfm package. Basically, the ox-gfm package defines an exporter that derives from the ox-md exporter, which derives from the ox-html exporter. The html exporter states that all timestamps need to be run through the org-html-timestamp function, which is what prints out the span you see. Neither the md or gfm exporter ...


2

Adding :exports none should take care of that: #+BEGIN_SRC bash :exports none pandoc --bibliography=biblidatabase.bib --filter pandoc-citeproc \ latexfile.tex -o outputfile.odt #+END_SRC See Exporting Code Blocks in the manual.


2

As @rpluim mentions in a comment, setting org-export-with-sub-superscripts to nil would disable the special handling of ^ and _ for subscripts and superscripts. There is one more variable that is relevant (when org-export-with-sub-superscripts is t) and that is org-use-sub-superscripts which can be set to t or nil - or it can be set to the value {}. I find ...


2

I would continue using the macro. You can use markup inside the macro that expands differently for HTML export than it does for PDF export. For example, as a first approximation, this will allow you to get the dates in the HTML output, although they are not nicely formatted - but it's a beginning: #+MACRO: date @@latex: \hfill\normalfont{\small $1} @@ @@...


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