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2

You could put the example in a separate section and tag it noexport: * example input :noexport: #+name: input #+begin_example 5 1 3 2 0 #+end_example * example code #+begin_src python :results output :eval yes :var x=input :exports results import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import numpy as np x = ...


1

I don't think org offers any way to exclude example blocks from exporting. A possible work-around: if you don't want the example to show up in your export, does it need to be an example? You could make it a bash code block instead: * example #+name: input #+begin_src bash :exports none echo 5 1 3 2 0 #+end_src #+begin_src python :results output :eval yes :...


1

There are so many options. You can define a function to insert a string, or use the built-in skeleton library like this: (define-skeleton meeting-skeleton "A meeting skeleton" nil "* Attendants * Updates * Notes") then to insert your template, type M-x meeting-skeleton at the place you want to insert the string. Another option is yas-...


0

The description of the special property ‘CLOCKSUM’ contains a hint that "[...] ‘org-clock-sum’ must be run first to compute the values in the current buffer". Eval'ing (org-clock-sum) in the buffer solved the issue for me.


0

Many thanks to authors of the comments above, they helped me realize that automatically adjusting org tags in the .org file was not the best approach to what I wanted (automatic ordering of todos in agenda view based on deadline). A better approach is to use a tool like org-super-agenda.


1

You should be able to use directory-local variables for this: do C-h i g(emacs)Per-directory local variables RET to find out more information. Briefly, create a file named .dir-locals.el in your blog directory where the Org mode files that you publish are kept. Put the following in the file: ((org-mode . ((org-html-head-include-default-style . nil) ...


1

C-c C-v C-t runs org-babel-tangle and exports all code blocks to the current buffer name plus the correct code extension (e.g. html blocks get .html, python blocks get .py). You can specify the tangled filename with the :tangle property at the header, section, or file level. Run C-u C-c C-v C-t to only tangle the current code block containing the point.


0

I think you should change :wrap math to :wrap export latex. That should wrap the output in a #+begin_latex: block, which should in turn export the way you want.


2

Not that I know of, but Org mode provides the ingredients to roll your own easily: (defun org-table-goto-beginning () (interactive) (goto-char (org-table-begin))) (defun org-table-goto-end () (interactive) (goto-char (org-table-end))) (define-key org-mode-map (kbd "C-c t b") #'org-table-goto-beginning) (define-key org-mode-map (kbd &...


0

Just realized the answer to my question: hit C-c ' for org-edit-special and then save the buffer to a new file.


0

Unless you meant this occurs when you press RET on a new line. In which case, that's electric-indent-mode. (electric-indent-mode -1) ; globally ;; or (add-hook! 'org-mode-hook (electric-indent-local-mode -1)) From: https://github.com/hlissner/doom-emacs/issues/3872#issuecomment-684176505 by @hlissner (Github).


0

I solved it myself! (defun sanitize-noter-import () "Sanitizes org-noter imports. This operates on '* Contents' headings" (interactive) (let (heading cbeg cend) (org-map-entries (lambda () (if (string= "Contents" (org-element-property :title (org-element-at-point))) (progn (message "Found ...


0

For short, C-u C-c C-c on the first item of a list can turn the whole list into checklist. Checkboxes (The Org Manual) says C-c C-c (org-toggle-checkbox) Toggle checkbox status or — with prefix argument — checkbox presence at point. With a single prefix argument, add an empty checkbox or remove the current one. With a double prefix argument, set it to ‘[-]...


0

You could use the Orgtbl-Aggregate package available on Melpa The sums are in a separate table, easy to update #+name: mytable | a | b | c | |---+---+---| | 1 | 2 | i | | 3 | 4 | j | #+BEGIN: aggregate :table "mytable" :cols "vsum(a) vsum(b) vsum(a*b)" | vsum(a) | vsum(b) | vsum(a*b) | |---------+---------+-----------| | 4 | ...


0

Been hit by this a few times, so here is my workings: Some text before the properties, this should according to the manual, prevent properties from working... - Seems to work fine - which I like. # These work for 'shell' only, not 'sh'. #+PROPERTY: header-args:shell :var propC_headArgsCshell_0="1st" #+PROPERTY: header-args:shell+ :var ...


1

You can use an orgmode macro for this. It supports evaluating elisp code like this: #+MACRO: year (eval (format-time-string "%Y")) #+TITLE: Annual Report for {{{year}}} There's a built-in macro for rendering the time a document is exported, which takes a time format as an argument. This should handle your particular example: #+TITLE: Annual ...


3

One way might be like this, where expansion only occurs conditionally. Put this statement in an init file, or in an org-mode hook function and you should not get expansion in src-blocks. (setq abbrev-expand-function (lambda () (unless (org-in-src-block-p) (abbrev--default-expand))))


2

[The answer version of my comment on the question.] Check the value of org-fontify-quote-and-verse-block, which is nil by default, meaning those blocks should be fontified like regular org.


1

If I understand you question correctly you wish to interpret ansi color codes in the results of org babel code blocks. I achieved this by adding a hook to org-babel-after-execute-hook: (defun ek/babel-ansi () (when-let ((beg (org-babel-where-is-src-block-result nil nil))) (save-excursion (goto-char beg) (when (looking-at org-babel-result-...


2

Others have stated that it's C-c C-, now to insert templates. One cool thing is that you can paste some code, then visual-select it and do C-c C-, s and it will wrap your selection inside #+begin_src and #+end_src. Before, when it was <s TAB, I had made a function to do that but now, I can do it with the native command. All I have to do is forget about &...


0

[Note: following still "under construction" and active investigation.] summary: It's a mess. Org-mode issue management seems to have "grown organically." details: Thanks to commenters to my question, and going down their rabbitholes, I might understand--maybe-- how org-mode issues are currently tracked. TODO: ontological problems: issue ...


0

Another implementation, possibly shorter. Does not require elisp. #+NAME: diff #+BEGIN_SRC bash :var a="foo.txt" b="bar.txt" :results verbatim :wrap src diff diff -u $a $b patch -s $a <(diff -u $a $b) #+END_SRC #+CALL: diff(a="foo.txt", b="bar.txt") #+RESULTS: #+begin_src diff --- foo.txt 2021-02-22 04:58:22....


1

If those keys were defined in Emacs' global keymap then you would be unsetting them correctly, but the end result would be the same -- Emacs is receiving events it interprets as (say) M-+ and it would tell you that nothing is bound to that key. I.e. you're trying to unbind keys which aren't bound to start with, so the result doesn't change. It's your OS ...


0

I found the answer. Doing this does the trick: (use-package! mixed-pitch :hook (org-mode . mixed-pitch-mode) :config (setq mixed-pitch-set-heigth t) (set-face-attribute 'variable-pitch nil :height 1.3)) I have set the height for my normal font to 1.0: (setq doom-font (font-spec :family "Fira Code" :style "Retina" :size 14 :height ...


3

You can make your own execute function for diff blocks. #+BEGIN_SRC emacs-lisp (defun org-babel-execute:diff (body params) (with-temp-buffer (insert body "\n") (shell-command-on-region (point-min) (point-max) "patch" "*patch*") (prog1 (with-current-buffer "*patch*" (buffer-string)) (kill-buffer &...


0

(Extending Andrew Swann above) Following may be a superset of what you want, but here goes: I typically want to see all the markup (for everything, not just for links), occasionally switching back to the default/pretty display (mostly as a form of Org syntax validation). Hence I mostly set my display to turn off font-lock mode in my Org buffers, with ...


0

I am sorry, I found (probably) a solution (my actual example): #+NAME:electro | TIME | low | high | heatpump | water | accurain | repy1 | repy2 | repy3 | repy4 | |-------------------------+-------+------+----------+-------+----------+-------+-------+-------+-------| | 2016-10-15 08:41:00.000 | 24830 | 3242 | 7308 | 2294 | NaN | ...


3

Instead of just rely on the done/not done state, you can specify for each task if you should record a timestamp on entering/leaving it. The relevant bit from C-h v org-todo-keywords is Each keyword may also specify if a timestamp or a note should be recorded when entering or leaving the state, by adding additional characters in the parenthesis after the ...


1

You can either use the calc syntax or the elisp syntax. | x | calc syntax | elisp syntax | |---+-------------+--------------| | 1 | 0 | 0.0000 | | 2 | 0.6931 | 0.6931 | #+TBLFM: $2=log($1);n4::$3='(log $1);N%.4f Notice that the output format of the calc syntax depends on the ~/.emacs.d/calc.el parameters. (plist-put org-calc-...


1

I don't find this any easier than what you have already shown, but here are some different approaches that use advanced features (https://orgmode.org/manual/Advanced-features.html) of naming fields in tables. You have to put the $ in the first column to name these constants. Getting these into your variable is a little verbose, but explicit at least. The org-...


1

The Org mode spreadsheet is not like Excel: you don't create formulas in one cell and then propagate them to other cells (well, you can - do C-h i g (org)Field and range formulas, but propagating them is basically a matter of cutting and pasting). You can instead use a #+TBLFM after the table to do all that: |------------+------------+------------+-----------...


0

Well, actually =ln(1) works in org-table, I just tested it. I didn't know because I didn't find it in the documentation...


1

Yes, you can do so by using the :post() header argument. I will present two solutions. The first one is simpler but has two disadvantages. I would consider the second solution the way to go. First solution Consider the following Org Mode file. We can call the dash code block after the c++ code block is executed by executing org-babel-execute-src-block, which ...


0

This github issue explains the source of the issue. Currently C-c C-, s Will insert a source code block. Note that there are a suite of other templates that can be inserted this way by choosing a letter other than s. At first I really didn't like this change but I have gotten used to it, it takes about the same amount of effort as <s TAB for me but has ...


0

Actually, I experience the same behaviour, even if I choose native highlight instead of latex. It seems that it gets confused because in org-mode you can insert even currency such as $3500 and .12$. So it's difficult to distinguish whether and expression is indeed a latex expression or if it's a text inside two monetary values. If you are using latex I ...


1

It's not clear to me why Emacs hangs in what you describe, or what you mean by that. But I think you're talking about accidentally defining a large region of text, and then killing or copying that, and that it is that killing or copying that you want to avoid. If that's the case, then this may help: wimpy-del.el. It's what I bind to C-w, in place of kill-...


1

Untested, but I think adding this to your init file (defun prio () (format "[#%c]" org-default-priority)) and then using ... * %(prio) TODO ... in your capture template should do the trick. E.g. (add-to-list 'org-capture-templates '("s" "Shopping" entry (file+headline "~/lib/org/shopping.org" "...


1

Org mode uses the standard Emacs minibuffer completion mechanism for tags: whenever a tag is expected (e.g. at the C-c a m prompt), you can type TAB to get a completion list. You can click on a completion to choose it (or, without a mouse, switch to the completion buffer, navigate to the completion of interest and press RET); or you can narrow down the ...


1

That is the correct way to do it. Your only other approach is to use something like ivy or helm, which when you type C-c a m will offer you a list of tags that you can use completion on to narrow down.


4

tl;dr: #+LINK: jira https://jira.mycompany.com/browse/%s [[jira:TASK-1234][TASK-1234: label]] will create the links you desire. As NickD mentions, find "Link Abbreviations" in the org manual., also via C-h i g (org)Link Abbreviations <RET>


1

The glyphs in your Bengali font are not the same width as the glyphs in the font you're using for everything else. In fact, your main font very likely doesn't have any Bengali glyphs in it at all, so Emacs is falling back to other fonts that you have installed on your system. With the glyph shaping that Bengali requires, it may not even be possible to have a ...


8

You can use a file link like this: file:f1.cpp::507ab9d0-d1a5-4fa9-97a9-d78a48a08c3d It should open the file and then search for the string you put in.


1

OK the following solution did the trick: add #+PROPERTY: header-args :var baseUrl="http://localhost:3000" restart org-mode Ctrlcc in my case while staying on that PROPERTY line Messages buffer would the following lines as a result: >org-mode restarted >Local setup has been refreshed Take a look at this related question if you want to ...


0

After testing one of suggested solution I decided to create my own package which function that converts link at point to archive.org processed link. It's available here: https://github.com/farynaio/org-url-archive


1

The following package provides an excellent solution and is easy to set up: org-web-tools (require 'org-web-tools) (bind-key "C-x w" 'org-web-tools-read-url-as-org) https://github.com/alphapapa/org-web-tools


0

It seems you have figured out almost everything. Using :var data=heading and #+name: heading already does the conversion of a table into a list for you and binds it to a variable by that name. Here's a full example: * Recipes ** Killer Sandwich :PROPERTIES: :ID: 0123 :END: A really good sandwich! #+name: sandwich_recipe | 1 | piece | ...


0

You may want to check my answer here Summary: (setq org-log-done t) puts both clocking and state changes in the :LOGBOOK: drawer. Nice and tidy.


1

I'm not sure I'm more daring than @lawlist, but I'm almost certainly foolish for even encouraging you in this: after all, the X's are exactly there to mark those list items as done; so why delete them? That said, here's some code that seems to work in the above situation (the only situation tested). The code does use kill-region, so you should be able to ...


0

It turns out, Rainbow Identifiers does a great job highlighting code outside src blocks in emacs org-mode. If no one gets around to this.


0

I think the org-link face is set exclusively not in addition to other faces. And there is only a fixed reference point for :inherit. There would either have to be a context sensitive :inherit or different faces for the context, like with the org-level faces. There is org-level-1, org-level-2 and so forth. But there are no separate faces for org-link-level-1,...


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