3

It is because - is used to denote ranges of characters. One will have to escape - for it to not have that meaning when placed between two other characters. See the function definition below: (defun windows-path-backwards () (interactive) (skip-chars-backward "a-zA-Z0-9\\\\_\\-:")) In other words, : is not important in itself, it just happened to be ...


2

It gives you the first match it finds. In your abc example, c is a match for [[:alpha:]]+, so it stops there. The actual regexp matching is always forwards; it's just the starting position which is moved backwards until a match is found. If you searched for "\\b[[:alpha:]]+" then abc would be the first match. Note that what you are (IIUC) expecting would ...


1

Using web-mode you can traverse the dom tree element by element and then traversing element attributes killing/sparing each one manually without having to code anything, just learning the keybindings. Doing it automatically will require some coding. I guess you can do something similar with other related modes with more or less effort. If you're looking for ...


1

In Emacs 26.3 at least, the allowed characters are hard-coded in thing-at-point-bounds-of-url-at-point; so you would need to modify that function accordingly, to add a backslash to the allowed-chars binding. The comments below on escaping would apply here too: use "\\\\". (And likewise for having no idea whether or not this will have unwanted side-effects.)...


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