10

You can set the value of find-file-visit-truename to t — for instance with customise via M-x customize-variable RET find-file-visit-truename or just with (setq find-file-visit-truename t). This will result in dired-find-file and Emacs in general, always following symlinks when opening a file or directory. (See the documentation of find-file-visit-truename ...


6

It's really quite simple; don't do that: I use (setq vc-follow-symlinks nil) to not prompt to ask yes/no and not follow to the real file It doesn't make much sense to set this variable to nil and find-file-visit-truename to t. Both variables control whether Emacs should follow symlinks when visiting files. But the latter is much more aggressive. vc-...


6

I had the same problem and added ;;; When opening a file that is a symbolic link, don't ask whether I ;;; want to follow the link. Just do it (setq find-file-visit-truename t) to my .emacs file. Unfortunately I can't remember where on the web I found this, so no source credits.


4

From File Aliases: Normally, if you visit a file which Emacs is already visiting under a different name, Emacs displays a message in the echo area and uses the existing buffer visiting that file. This can happen on systems that support hard or symbolic links, or if you use a long file name on a system that truncates long file ...


4

Using dired+, which brings other cool improvements to dired, you only need to set the toggle-diredp-find-file-reuse-dir var to t.


4

Symbolic links of the form “.#*” are not auto-save files, their purpose is to prevent the simultaneous editing of the same file. See Interlocking and File Locks in the Emacs Manual.


2

Dunno whether there is something specific to ls-lisp (haven't found it), but for Dired more generally, if you turn on dired-hide-details-mode (e.g., using (), and if you the value of option dired-hide-details-hide-symlink-targets is non-nil then the targets of symlinks are hidden when details are hidden. (If the length of the target name is a problem you ...


1

Looks like your symlink is a finder alias and not a symlink. OSX Finder handles both of them the same way, but at system level the finder alias is a plain file. Substitute the finder alias for a proper unix symlink using ln -s command and it should work.


1

As mentioned in my comment underneath the question above, there is no built-in support for identifying a symlink using the speedbar library. The following code adds that support -- differentiating between a symlink directory versus a filename. Evaluate the code below and then open a speedbar window, or refresh a window if it is already open. (require '...


1

A solution based on Microsoft junction by Mark Russinovich. (defun get-target (dir) "If DIR is a junction, return its target, else return DIR. The 'junction' util is assumed to be in your path." (setq dir (expand-file-name (substitute-in-file-name dir))) (let* (out (bin "junction.exe")) (unless (executable-find bin) (error (concat "Unable ...


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