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64

I personally stick to writing things in org-mode with flyspell-mode and langtool... org-mode is fantastic for typing any sort of document quickly in Emacs, flyspell takes care of spelling, and langtool worries about the grammar. Everything is highly customizable too, so you can customize anything to your heart's content. Here is a quick little type-up in ...


43

The problem with existing version control systems is not so much their complexity; it's the fact that there is such a wealth of information out there that it can be very difficult for beginners to see the forest for the trees (i.e., to figure out what they do and don't need to learn when they are just getting started). This post is going to focus on git, ...


26

This may be a preferred way (due to it's simplicity) of accomplishing your goal -- it seems to have gotten buried in the comments of another answer: Add the following to your .emacs file: (require 'ox-extra) (ox-extras-activate '(ignore-headlines)) Use the ignore tag on headlines you'd like to have ignored (while not ignoring their content) NOTE: if you ...


16

Yes, this is entirely possible. Add the following code to your init-file: (defun org-remove-headlines (backend) "Remove headlines with :no_title: tag." (org-map-entries (lambda () (delete-region (point-at-bol) (point-at-eol))) "no_title")) (add-hook 'org-export-before-processing-hook #'org-remove-headlines) Acknowledgments This ...


15

I write novels using Emacs, and have developed a workflow over time based on certain unique advantages of it. (Example: My most recent book was conceived, composed, and edited with Emacs.) That said, it is not a road without difficulties. Org-mode Org-mode is the reason I began using Emacs. Being able to fold and unfold sections of a ~50K-words manuscript ...


15

The EmacsWiki category Writing is the place to start. It lists dozens of libraries that support writing text using Emacs, with one-liner descriptions and links to the detail pages. There is no sense listing such info again here - consult it there. (But perhaps others here will have specific recommendations.) I will mention only the subcategory page ...


13

Try setting sentence-end-double-space to nil.


11

Spin off of the original answer to the linked question. Grammar Check: I am not aware of any dedicated grammar parsers for emacs yet. I will mention writegood-mode available in MELPA which highlights weasel words and passive voice in the buffer. It gets you half the way there. Another possibly useful library is dupwords.el which can highlight if a ...


11

In addition to magit (as @itsjeyd's answer ably demonstrates), you can also try git-timemachine, which provides facilities for quick cycling through older versions of a file under git version control. According to its github page, the following default keybindings give you a sense of what you can do: p Visit previous historic version n Visit next historic ...


10

With markdown-mode by Jason Blevins you can toggle folding of the heading with Tab (same as in org-mode).


10

For general purpose spell-checking, there are quite a few popular alternatives ispell and friends: Built into emacs & typically called with ispell-buffer. Checks spelling only on demand. flyspell-mode: Also built-in and provides on-the-fly spell checking and highlights mistakes. speck-mode: Available from MELPA, it checks the spelling of the word once ...


9

You're probably using single space sentences, which is fine, but you need to tell Emacs about it. (setq sentence-end-double-space nil)


9

I think this is a great question. I'm sure there are tons of super helpful modes that fiction writers don't know they need. I happened upon palimpsest-mode by accident, but now I couldn't live without it. I'd love to see what packages other fiction writers find useful. Here are some that I use every day: palimpsest-mode. Sends selected text to the bottom ...


8

I suspect you'll find Backups Mode and/or Backup Walker very interesting. Both aim to leverage the existing backup mechanisms in Emacs, and provide better access to and visibility of your file history, without requiring an additional VCS.


6

Here is what I take to be your goal: The ability to focus on a particular chunk of text while getting the rest of it out of your way, The ability to move big chunks of text around quickly. This solution uses only out-of-the-box Emacs functionality: org-mode narrowing split windows indirect buffers First of all, if you write your document in org-mode (or ...


6

If you are comfortable with occur, then try this: M-x occur RET \b[A-Z]\{2,4\}\b You can play with 2,4 values to adjust to your needs, perhaps different values for different parts of your thesis. Results are shown in a new buffer. Since occur is available on default installations of Emacs, you don't have to add new libraries or dependencies.


6

@Vamsi's answer already covers general-purpose and selective spell-checking. But what about personalized auto-correction? @Malabarba has a nice post about this topic on his blog. The basic idea is to store pairs of misspelled words and appropriate corrections as Abbrevs. Here is (a slightly modified version of) the code that lets you do this easily: (defun ...


6

As was mentioned, a simple way to have different versions of a file is Emacs backup system. (setq backup-directory-alist '(("." . "~/emacs-backups")) version-control 'numbered make-backup-files t delete-old-versions 'never) This will use a dedicated directory for numbered backups, which will never automatically deleted. Then you can use ...


5

I use writeroom-mode for that. It's available in MELPA.


4

Here's a couple of functions that will do what you want (make sure to (require 'cl-lib) first). They will gather all the abbreviations of 3 capital letters or more, along with the point location that you first used them. They will then create a new buffer *Abbreviations* that will list them and their locations. (Despite the uncreative function names, they ...


4

Bastein (one of the org-mode developers/maintainers) had written a nice blog on how to give minimalistic look to emacs (no mode line, big fringes on the sides) a while ago. Here is the full code from his gist. You can pick and choose from that based on what you want to implement. Here is a snippet from his gist that will give you 'narrow column text' or ...


2

I've found two ways that can be useful: enable hideshow mode (hs-minor-mode) and use the provided functions Apparently markdown-mode inherits from outline mode (or at least the functions are available here!) so you can use functions like hide-subtree and show-subtree.


2

I've not yet had the opportunity to use this solution, but you may also want to consider Cory Doctorow and Thomas Gideon's flashbake. Here's what Doctorow has to say about it: I was prompted to do this after discussions with several digital archivists who complained that, prior to the computerized era, writers produced a series complete drafts on the way ...


2

suppose you use company-mode and you only want to use it in text-mode. org-mode inherits from text-mode, so you don't need setup for both: (require 'company) (add-hook 'after-init-hook 'global-company-mode) (defun text-mode-hook-setup () ;; make `company-backends' local is critcal ;; or else, you will have completion in every major mode, that's very ...


2

Predictive-mode claims to be what you're looking for, though I'm not sure how it compares to more modern completion frameworks like company-mode.


2

Go to the beginning of your text and press C-M-%. That key sequence is bound to the command query-replace-regexp. Give \([+-]?[0-9]+\|\_<[[:alpha:]]\)/\([+-]?[0-9]+\|[[:alpha:]]\_>\) as search string and {\1 \\over \2} as replacement and press RET. Note that this searches for integers maybe composed of several digits and with optional sign + or -. ...


1

You need provide a "plain word-list dictionary". Step 1, Check the code of company-ispell, it actually calls ispell-lookup-words. Step 2, check ispell-lookup-words documentation: "Optional second argument contains the dictionary to use; the default is ‘ispell-alternate-dictionary’, overridden by ‘ispell-complete-word-dict’ if defined." Step 3, check ...


1

This org-file worked for me: #+latex_header: \usepackage{xr} #+latex_header: \externaldocument[si-]{supplemental-info} #+options: toc:nil In Figure ref:si-some-fig you can see it. with this supplemental-org file: #+options: toc:nil In the beginning. #+name: some-fig #+caption: caption [[./test.png]] See Figure ref:some-fig. #+BEGIN_SRC emacs-lisp (...


1

This answer is not exhaustive, but I cannot post this in the comments because it has an image. May the table of contents you are talking about look something like below? Another ad hoc way to have an outline is to run M-s o^\s-*\* (which is equivalent to M-xoccur). Even though this isn't a proper outline, more often than not, I find this to be an adequate ...


1

I have used this tool in the past and it works great emacs-fullscreen-win32 It is a executable and when run it looks for emacs and does some windows magic to make Emacs frames full screen. The readme has all the info you need to get it setup. Just download the executable and add something like this to your config: (defun toggle-full-screen () "Toggles ...


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