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12

You can use elisp-index-search. I use it daily. I use it mostly when I already know a function name and want to see it in emacs lisp manual.


10

EDIT: I just found the wonderful M-x info-apropos which searches full text over all info documents and returns the relevant nodes. Seems this gem is relatively unknown. If you use helm package from MELPA with helm-mode on, using either i (info-index) or I (info-virtual-index) pops up a helm window with the index terms. You can then use typical helm ...


9

Some bookmarking commands to get you started: C-x r m – set a bookmark at the current location (e.g. in a file) C-x r b – jump to a bookmark C-x r l – list your bookmarks M-x bookmark-delete – delete a bookmark by name Courtesy of emacswiki


9

Some information about advices An advice is mainly a method of last resort to customize the behavior of functions defined in other libraries. There are many variants of advice. Examples are: overriding the function with another function (That is the extreme case where one completely replaces the original function.) wrapping the original function with an ...


8

It sounds as if the dir file within your info directories don't contain all the nodes that it should. You can verify this by looking at the contents of the file /usr/share/info/emacs-24/dir (if this is the directory that's lacking entries). Normally, this file will be updated by the program that installs the info file, but you can also do it manually. If ...


8

IIRC the red highlight was introduced to help you count entries so you can jump directly to menu entries by number (the red stars correspond to entries 3, 6, and 9 respectively). I've never made use of that feature, so I'm not sure how valuable it is.


8

It's not enough to just duplicate the frame (e.g. C-x 5 2). You need to clone the Info buffer. Open Info to the first place, then use M-n to clone the buffer. Then navigate in the new Info window (new buffer) to the second place. In other words, it should just work, but you need to use M-n to clone the buffer (getting a new, different buffer). If you don'...


7

The history of visited nodes is stored in the variable Info-history-list. You will need to persist this variable across sessions. One way to do so it to use desktop-mode. Desktop mode automatically persists the variables that are declared in desktop-globals-to-save. So if you use desktop-mode something like the following should doe the trick (add-to-list '...


7

This is a great question! I've found the directions online to install it by hand unclear and, frankly, a bit of a pain (at least on Debian). On Debian... Emacs on Debian doesn't come with the Emacs Lisp Reference Manual by default. It's kind of silly, but Debian stores it in the non-free repos. Unfortunately, a regular apt-get install doesn't Just Work™...


6

C-h i runs the info command by default, which searches for info files in Info-directory-list. If this is nil Info uses the environment variable INFOPATH or Info-default-directory-list if no INFOPATH variable is defined. When the info files are not found it is possible that one or more of these values has been incorrectly customised.


6

The info reader in Emacs can be accessed with C-h i. There you can jump directly into the some-node node with g (some-node) RET. Alternatively, you can go to the some-node node by eval'ing (info "some-node"). Note that the info reader on the terminal picks man pages when info nodes cannot be found. There is no "glibc" info node, but just a man page. To ...


6

You can't. A proper text layout for proportional fonts would require dynamic re-filling of paragraphs, which is generally impossible to do correctly with info documents, since they contain no semantic information at all. Same for docstrings, which you see in Help Mode, except that these don't even start with any markup at all... Hence it's impossible to ...


6

More of a full text search but C-s (isearch-forward) will search through the whole info document if you repeat enough times. I use it mostly as a desperation measure when I can't work out the actual term that appears in the index.


6

The built-in Info-mode uses a combination of initial uppercase and/or all lowercase letters for the various variables/functions/faces. There may be a rhyme or reason, but it quite frankly escapes me as I read through the source-code. I wish there were a better method than familiarizing ourselves with the source code by typing M-x find-library RET info RET ...


6

The usual way to get to the org mode manual is: Start the info system, C-h i open the menu, m enter org <RET> This will get you to the first page of the manual. You can also use the command org-info, i.e., M-x org-info, to jump directly to that manual. If you want to quickly jump to arbitrary info pages, you have a few options. The function info ...


5

You can set a bookmark to where you are. Normally it is bound to C-x r m, and you can give it a name. To see the list of bookmarks, C-x r l.


5

@Iqbal gives a great answer to your question. You might also consider using bookmarks to record Info locations of interest, including a bookmark for where you left off (which you update at the next left-off place, by just setting it again). This is simple to do, and is exactly what you would do with a book or multiple books that you are reading.


5

If you use library Info+ (info+.el) then the current node name is in the mode line by default. In fact, breadcrumbs are shown in the mode line by default (and the breadcrumbs end in the current node name). This is controlled by option and command Info-breadcrumbs-in-mode-line-mode. (You can alternatively or additionally show breadcrumbs in the header ...


5

In addition to info-lookup-symbol (C-h S), if you use library help-fns+.el then C-h f, C-h v, or C-h k includes a link to look up the function (or variable etc.) in the manuals (using the index). You control which manuals are searched by way of user option help-cross-reference-manuals. The default behavior is to look in the Emacs and Elisp manuals. See ...


5

According to the package database, you can find gnus.info.gz in emacs24-common-non-dfsg and /usr/share/info/emacs-25/gnus.info.gz, along with a lot of other info manuals.


4

info-lookup-symbol bound by default to C-h S can search info indices to find the relevant node for symbol corresponding to point.


4

This is the key point for me: org-mode has a lot of capability and is really flexible for changing or moving content Texinfo is great for static manuals, and has nice features for navigation, tables of contents, indexes and bookmarking. But it is a "compiled" language, meaning you write in .texinfo format, and then compile to .info files that are then ...


4

I was looking for the variable Info-hide-note-references. Specifically, setting it to 'hide results in the behavior I want. The Sphinx FAQ goes into more detail about this, and suggests the following advice to automatically enable this on sphinx-generated files (Fixed since the regex they suggest wasn't working) (defvar-local Info-hide-note-references t) (...


3

The following solution relies upon three (3) command-line utilities: find; xargs; and zgrep. In putting together the following function, I discovered that grep cannot see inside gizipped files, and not all versions of zgrep are able to search recursively. Inasmuch as zgrep can handle both gzipped and unzipped .info files, the function includes a search ...


3

Add the directory containing the *.info files to Info-directory-list, using add-to-list. If it provides an Info manual, the package should have taken care of this for you. Node Multi-File Packages of the Elisp manual says this: If the content directory contains a file named dir, this is assumed to be an Info directory file made with install-info. *...


3

(Expanding from the commentary on the question:) You're not actually colorizing keywords in manual pages that way; you're just colorizing bold, underlined, or "standout" mode text, which styles are by convention used for things like program names. The same isn't done in e.g. the Emacs Lisp manual, so the same technique won't work. On the other hand, there ...


3

When you want to install an Info file in a custom directory, in addition to telling your Info Reader where that directory is, you need to create/update dir file under that directory with install-info program (see here to learn how to do it).


3

In the buffer list displayed by list-buffers you can see the current node and Info file in the last column (named File). But if you want to add the current node name to the buffer name, then when visiting a new node just type the prefix arg C-u before a navigation command (e.g. C-u f where f is bound to Info-follow-reference, or C-u RET where RET is bound to ...


3

The closest I know of is searching the index by running Info-virtual-index (bound to I) from within the manual.


3

The top-level dir content of Info is not from a static file. See function Info-insert-dir in info.el. You can do C-x C-q to make the buffer writable, then select a set of lines and do M-x sort-lines, to sort by the manual name. You can do the same thing programmatically, if you want. Changing fill-column won't help. As @Tyler suggested, that formatting is ...


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